The Sun Also Rises

Ernest Hemingway is one of those authors that has SUCH a distinguishing sort of author’s voice. Of course, it doesn’t help that I didn’t start reading him until after I watched Midnight in Paris, where he is so well played by Corey Stoll. When I read A Farewell to Arms, I immediately heard Stoll’s rendition of Hemingway throughout the book, and I continued to hear it in Jake’s narration of The Sun Also Rises.

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I didn’t care for this book as well as Farewell. The story just didn’t click as much. I think for me, the characters were just annoying and trivial. Whiney and drunk, with no purpose. Though I suppose, that’s how Hemingway lived most of his life in Paris, so that makes sense. At least Farewell was about love and war.

Throughout this book, I couldn’t help but compare Brett to one of John Green’s little pixie dream girls. She was the only girl around, she was the center of attention all the time, EVERYONE was in love with her, of course. She was always drunk and depressed. Her only role in the book seemed to make the guys fight and fawn all over her. I wanted her to be so much more than that.

I know Hemingway was trying to make a metaphor with the bulls and steers and the unwanted Cohn. Maybe I just don’t understand bull-fighting in Spain enough, but it went over my head.

This one might take another reread or two before I fully comprehend it. I still love Hemingway’s voice, something about it just flows with me. But, this one had a lot more dialogue, and a lot less substance than Farewell, at least to me.

0 thoughts on “The Sun Also Rises

  1. Its a very good read to compare his skeletal type naration to the very winded voices of his contemporaries. Its better as an analysis of his unique style, but it isn’t his best work.

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