The Vampire Chronicles: Interview With the Vampire

Series. The bain of my existence. Don’t get me wrong, I love a great series…but they are SUCH a commitment. And as a blogger, they are so hard to review, because do I a) read them as the books come out individually or b) wait until the full series is out? 

I almost never read a series when it is first out…but then I procrastinate reading the full thing in one go because then I have to forgo everything else I am reading. 

It’s such a challenge to fit everything in. TOO MANY BOOKS.

So, we are going to try something new here on ILR. I’m going to read full series, and review them, all in a row. I’ll post these on Mondays, and you can follow along with me as I read each book!

Up first:  The Vampire Chronicles by Anne Rice. I have the big silver Omnibus from Barnes & Noble, so it’s a great place to start. I read Interview with the Vampire in 2015, so the below is an updated version of that review.

Here are the confessions of a vampire. Hypnotic, shocking, and chillingly erotic, this is a novel of mesmerizing beauty and astonishing force—a story of danger and flight, of love and loss, of suspense and resolution, and of the extraordinary power of the senses. It is a novel only Anne Rice could write.

Vampires have never held much interest for me in the supernatural world. I’ve always been much more interested in magic–witches and dragons and elves. The whole blood-sucking thing…not for me. It could be regional, I’m much more interested in old British lore than Germanic and Eastern European, which is where vampires reign supreme, so the ancient legends never made it into my repertoire. And the modern retellings…well…I’ll pass on Edward and Bella, thanks.

However, one can hardly be up to par on their literature lists without at least reading Anne Rice. Besides DraculaInterview with the Vampire is probably the most famous work on the subject. Rice’s lead character Louis gives an elaborate narrative to a young boy, detailing his life as an 18th century vampire in New Orleans and Paris. He tells how Lestat turned him in order to try and gain access to his property, and how they then took a child as their daughter. Lestat’s motives are always sinister, and Louis determines to get Claudia away as soon as possible. Thus begins a constant struggle for their eternal lives.

On my second readthrough, I picked up a lot more on the pedophilic undertones of the book. When I read Interview the first time, I thought Claudia’s age and relationship with Louis was weird–but it made sense in vampire-land, that she’d stay young. However, Lestat’s obsession with boys really creeps me out. I mean, Lestat is creepy all around, but why must he always “take” young boys? It would be one thing if it were just sucking their blood as food–but Rice clearly draws a relationship between the vampire lust for blood and human lust for sex–and so an older vampire taking children really messed with me.

By writing about these doomful creatures, Rice not only weaves an entertaining and dramatic novel. Louis has been written with quite they philosopher’s mind, and so the narrative thread weaves a tapestry rich with conversations about God versus Satan, morals and motives, and even a little creation theory. There’s no ignoring the depth in this one, and perhaps because you are encased in the world of vampires, it’s very hard to find the light.

I had originally given this 4 Book Dragons, but I’m going to drop it down to 3. I liked it, but not as much on the second read. Perhaps I went a little too far down into the dark. The next book is all about Lestat so…I have a feeling it’s about to get darker.

 

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Rosalyn Eves: Blood Rose Rebellion

The thrilling first book in a YA fantasy trilogy for fans of Red Queen. In a world where social prestige derives from a trifecta of blood, money, and magic, one girl has the ability to break the spell that holds the social order in place.

Sixteen-year-old Anna Arden is barred from society by a defect of blood. Though her family is part of the Luminate, powerful users of magic, she is Barren, unable to perform the simplest spells. Anna would do anything to belong. But her fate takes another course when, after inadvertently breaking her sister’s debutante spell—an important chance for a highborn young woman to show her prowess with magic—Anna finds herself exiled to her family’s once powerful but now crumbling native Hungary.

Her life might well be over.

In Hungary, Anna discovers that nothing is quite as it seems. Not the people around her, from her aloof cousin Noémi to the fierce and handsome Romani Gábor. Not the society she’s known all her life, for discontent with the Luminate is sweeping the land. And not her lack of magic. Isolated from the only world she cares about, Anna still can’t seem to stop herself from breaking spells.

As rebellion spreads across the region, Anna’s unique ability becomes the catalyst everyone is seeking. In the company of nobles, revolutionaries, and Romanies, Anna must choose: deny her unique power and cling to the life she’s always wanted, or embrace her ability and change that world forever.

I’ve been waiting for a series to spark my interest for sometime and finally Rosalyn Eves has come along to capture it. She blends historical fiction with magical fantasy and brings a revolution I’d never heard of to life.

At first, I thought I was going to have to put this book down, or at least do a hate read. I was side-eying it SO hard because she was using the derogatory term “Gypsy” over and over again. However, that turned out to be the point, and it was challenged multiple times later on–especially by the main character, after she was corrected and informed on it’s nasty connotation by her Romani friend.

Blood Rose Rebellion turned out to not only be a book about the Hungarian Rebellion in the 1800s, but also an outstanding look at privilege and the difference in hiding behind it, or using it to help those who do not have it. Anna took her Luminate privilege and made hard choices to fight for the rights of others to have a level playing field, instead of taking the easier path.

“I could not ignore the external factors–the threats to me and to those I loved. But stripped of those externals, the question was a simple one:  should every individual (man, woman, creature) be free to decide their own course?”

Ok, enough serious stuff–I fell IN LOVE with so many people in this book. The characters were so well fleshed out, I just couldn’t help it. I related to Anna quite a bit:  she didn’t fit in with her family because of differences in herself she could not change; she had an advocate’s heart and wanted to help people but didn’t always seem to know where to start–but once she got going, it was impossible to stop her or change her mind; and Anna felt deeply things that she felt she had an effect on–intentionally or unintentionally.

One of my favorite things about the story is the interesting relationship Anna has with the men. There is a whole fleet of ships:  Freddy, Gábor, Mátyás…even a character named Hunger is around for awhile. I can’t go into them because, spoilers. But jealousy never enters the picture, and it never feels like a love triangle situation.

The world building is also very strong. I fell right into the magical world of the Luminates. It almost feels Steampunkish to me–maybe it was just the time period, but that’s what I was imagining.

I need to stop going on and on and just let you read this book. And you should read it. The reviews on Goodreads haven’t been stellar, which makes me sad. I almost didn’t request it because of them. But give this a shot, seriously. I cannot wait for the second installment. I tend to go against popular opinion on big series, and this is just one of those–I loved it.

Blogging for Books and Alfred A Knopf provided a copy of this book for unbiased review.

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Carrie Mac: 10 Things I Can See From Here

Perfect for fans of Finding Audrey and Everything, Everything, this is the poignant and uplifting story of Maeve, who is dealing with anxiety while falling in love with a girl who is not afraid of anything.

Think positive.
Don’t worry; be happy.
Keep calm and carry on.

Maeve has heard it all before. She’s been struggling with severe anxiety for a long time, and as much as she wishes it was something she could just talk herself out of, it’s not. She constantly imagines the worst, composes obituaries in her head, and is always ready for things to fall apart. To add to her troubles, her mom—the only one who really gets what Maeve goes through—is leaving for six months, so Maeve will be sent to live with her dad in Vancouver.

Vancouver brings a slew of new worries, but Maeve finds brief moments of calm (as well as even more worries) with Salix, a local girl who doesn’t seem to worry about anything. Between her dad’s wavering sobriety, her very pregnant stepmom insisting on a home birth, and her bumbling courtship with Salix, this summer brings more catastrophes than even Maeve could have foreseen. Will she be able to navigate through all the chaos to be there for the people she loves?

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Anxiety is really starting to make the rounds in Contemporary YA. I really want that to be a good thing. I like that mental illness is getting more representation–and I have a hard time passing up books that serve that purpose. I’d heard mixed reviews about Carrie Mac’s hot pink f/f romance, but when I saw Blogging for Books was carrying it alongside their adult literary fiction I snatched it up the second it hit the request page.

If you have anxiety, you definitely need to be careful reading this novel. Mac uses stream of consciousness to narrate Maeve’s anxiety and it follows her constantly. I had a hard time with it during some points of the book because her way of catastrophizing every moment is very similar to mine.

There is a little bit of the “new relationship heals the disorder” trope in this book, but not to the extent that it was cringey or it made me hate the story. Salix does try and take the time to learn and understand Maeve’s anxiety. It’s a bit of an ebb and flow, one day she’ll get it, the next she’ll struggle a bit to understand–and that’s how a real relationship with someone like Maeve is. People who don’t have an anxiety disorder don’t get it all at once. So that felt really realistic to me. Also, there was one moment in the book where I wanted to kiss Salix my own damn self because she was just a freaking hero. But, spoilers.

Most of the book, though, really revolves around Maeve’s father and his addiction to drugs and alcohol. 10 Things is a good book about anxiety, sure, but it’s also a great book about what it’s like to be the child of an addict. She takes care of SO MANY PEOPLE in this book, all while thinking she is a horribly weak person because of her mental illness.

There’s a whole lot to unpack here, and I could spend SO much time going through every page. But…it’s late. And spoilers. Guess you’ll just have to go read the book.

Blogging for Books and Alfred A Knopf provided a copy of this book for unbiased review.

BUY HERE:

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