Ashley Poston: Geekerella

Geek girl Elle Wittimer lives and breathes Starfield, the classic sci-fi series she grew up watching with her late father. So when she sees a cosplay contest for a new Starfield movie, she has to enter. The prize? An invitation to the ExcelsiCon Cosplay Ball, and a meet-and-greet with the actor slated to play Federation Prince Carmindor in the reboot. With savings from her gig at the Magic Pumpkin food truck (and her dad’s old costume), Elle’s determined to win…unless her stepsisters get there first.

Teen actor Darien Freeman used to live for cons—before he was famous. Now they’re nothing but autographs and awkward meet-and-greets. Playing Carmindor is all he’s ever wanted, but Starfield fandom has written him off as just another dumb heartthrob. As ExcelsiCon draws near, Darien feels more and more like a fake—until he meets a girl who shows him otherwise. But when she disappears at midnight, will he ever be able to find her again?

Part romance, part love letter to nerd culture, and all totally adorbs, Geekerella is a fairy tale for anyone who believes in the magic of fandom.

Who needs fluffy Doctor Who Cinderella fan fiction?

I NEED FLUFFY DOCTOR WHO CINDERELLA FAN FICTION.

YES I DO YES I DO.

This book is GLORIOUS, people. The story follows a fangirl blogger and the incoming lead on a sci-fi serial in a You’ve Got Mail sort of situational romance. It has all of the traditional Cinderella elements we know, but modernized and nerdified.

HOORAY FOR DIVERSE CHARACTERS! One of the leads is POC, and there’s also LGBTQIA+ people. It is a Cinderella story, so there is emotional abuse, but that is to be expected.

I read Geekerella in a matter of hours. Once you start this, you won’t put it down. It’s just the right amount of fluff and substance. And if you’re part of the world of geekdom, you’ll find this instantly relatable. And who can resist the bright purple cover?

NetGalley and Quirk Books provided this ARC for unbiased review. This post contains affiliate links.

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Ella Enchanted

At birth, Ella is inadvertently cursed by an imprudent young fairy named Lucinda, who bestows on her the “gift” of obedience. Anything anyone tells her to do, Ella must obey. Another girl might have been cowed by this affliction, but not feisty Ella: “Instead of making me docile, Lucinda’s curse made a rebel of me. Or perhaps I was that way naturally.” When her beloved mother dies, leaving her in the care of a mostly absent and avaricious father, and later, a loathsome stepmother and two treacherous stepsisters, Ella’s life and well-being seem to be in grave peril. But her intelligence and saucy nature keep her in good stead as she sets out on a quest for freedom and self-discovery as she tries to track down Lucinda to undo the curse, fending off ogres, befriending elves, and falling in love with a prince along the way. Yes, there is a pumpkin coach, a glass slipper, and a happily ever after, but this is the most remarkable, delightful, and profound version of Cinderella you’ll ever read.

One of my friends has been on a mega fairy tale kick lately, and she sent Ella Enchanted my way last week when it was on sale. I think I read this way back when I was young, but I didn’t remember this story at all.

Cinderella has never been my favorite fairy tale–maybe it’s just not dark enough? You know I like a good, dark villain (like Maleficent). Ella Enchanted kicks up the classic story up a notch. It combines Sleeping Beauty‘s fairy gift with Ella’s obedience to show us that it isn’t always just the thought that counts.

After getting stuck this past week, it was nice to go back to some kidlit and relax my brain a bit. Ella Enchanted is such a sweet story–an easy read for an adult, but there are definitely some deep themes here:  friendship, honesty, secrets, manners, even learning foreign languages. Fairy tales were not only written for children, after all. It isn’t a new book by any means, but if you have kids (or even if you don’t), for sure pick it up from your library or book store for your next bedtime rotation.

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Scarlet

There are a lot of series out there who suffer from “Second Book Syndrome.” That sophomore part of the set just always seems to be mundane, usually because it’s a means to the end. The scene was set and characters introduced in the first book, and all the major drama and climaxes will happen in the third book. But in the second, all of the details are given. This is where all the real meat of the plot happens, and often a lot of the dialogue. Unfortunately, though, this can often make the second book very dull.

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When I started hearing about Marissa Meyer’s Lunar Chronicles, the most common theme was:  “The second book is better than the first!” “The series just keeps getting better!” “The first book was just ok, but the second book is going to blow you away!”

And then I read Cinder, and loved it. I mean, hello, futuristic badass cyborg Cinderella? Yes, please. So how was Meyer going to top that?!

Oh, only with a gardening pilot Red Riding Hood who falls in love with a secret agent Wolfman. That’s one way of doing it.

If you haven’t read these souped up fairy tales yet, what are you waiting for? I just ordered the whole series (or what I could…the last book hasn’t been published yet), and I am going to gobble them up like breakfast.

 

Fulfills PopSugar #35:  A book set in the future

Cinder

You all have been TORTURING me with this one. So many gorgeous pictures of Marissa Meyer’s Lunar Chronicles. I was raised in the golden years of Disney’s princesses, and so I love fairy tales. And now everyone is coming out with their own version of our favorite girls.

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Cinder is another book I had put on hold awhile back, and finally got this weekend–I couldn’t wait to read it. Everyone has been posting the hardcovers online and I’m not gonna lie–I almost just went out and bought the series. They are just too pretty.

I had heard that many bloggers didn’t care much for the first book, but that the second and third books were way better, so I expected to take Cinder in with a grain of salt. No salt needed! I loved this! A scifi Cinderella? This was awesome. Cinder was totally badass, and no fairy godmother needed. There was no bippity boppity boop needed, she took care of things her own self. She did have a little help from slighty ditzy doctor, but not much.

This book kind of reminded me of Wicked, in that it was a more politicized version of the original tale. The prince was no background handsome here. He took care of business. And, there was actually a wicked witch trying to start a war, in addition to the evil stepmother.

I could go on and on, and I’m really looking forward to reading the rest of the series. Hurry up, library. I need Scarlet pronto!!