Patrick Ness: A Monster Calls

The monster showed up after midnight. As they do.

But it isn’t the monster Conor’s been expecting. He’s been expecting the one from his nightmare, the one he’s had nearly every night since his mother started her treatments, the one with the darkness and the wind and the screaming…

This monster is something different, though. Something ancient, something wild. And it wants the most dangerous thing of all from Conor.

It wants the truth.

So usually when I tell you that a book made me cry, I don’t mean real tears. I get choked up or super emotional–I feel all the crying feels–but very rarely does a book ACTUALLY make me cry.

But I was having a seriously hard time holding it together when The Hubs and I were sitting by the bonfire and I was reading A Monster Calls. I’m not even talking “Oh it’s just the campfire smoke” kind of tears. No, this was full on sobbing kind of emotion.

I think it’s because we all know a family like this, right? A child who has to watch his parent slowly disintegrate before their eyes–everyone knows what is coming, but how do you explain it to that child?

Patrick Ness shows us so beautifully (and painfully) how much that child really does grasp–but without help, the grief twists those emotions into some terrible fears.

A Monster Calls is such a powerful and important book for both kids and their parents–not only for those families who are going through such a terrible tragedy–but every family. As I said before, we all know friends, neighbors, schoolmates who have or are going through this. I think (in my non-parent opinion, so take it or leave it) that this would be a good book to read together as a family, or at least talk about as you go through it. At least in my version, there were really great discussion questions in the back.

I’m super interested to see how closely the movie follows the book. I hope they stay true to the underlying message, and that it doesn’t get lost in Hollywood’s need for drama. I didn’t realize it was out already, guess I need to go watch it!

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Patrick Ness: The Rest of Us Just Live Here

What if you aren’t the Chosen One?

The one who’s supposed to fight the zombies, or the soul-eating ghosts, or whatever the heck this new thing is, with the blue lights and the death?

What if you’re like Mikey? Who just wants to graduate and go to prom and maybe finally work up the courage to ask Henna out before someone goes and blows up the high school. Again.

Because sometimes there are problems bigger than this week’s end of the world, and sometimes you just have to find the extraordinary in your ordinary life.

Even if your best friend is worshipped by mountain lions…

So much of YA is the dramatic story about murder and tragedy among the popular kids. Vampires and werewolves and magic trolls in dungeons. This isn’t that story. This is something else, running parallel. This is the story of Emily the Background Slytherin and her friends (OMG KEVIN RUN). Those kids in the background who might actually do the assignments for graduation, whose lives go on no matter what might roam the halls or blow up the school.

But most importantly, this story is about a boy with OCD, a girl with an eating disorder, and  has both racial and LGBTQIA+ representation. Friends of mine who also have similar anxiety to mine insisted that I read this book ASAP because of the discussions that take place and I’m so glad they did. From start to finish, the OCD rep is just so incredible.

Mikey (I sort of cringe at this name because of those old cereal commercials) has severe anxiety/OCD–he gets into obsessive loops where if he doesn’t do a task exactly “right” something horrible will happen. Life becomes catastrophic inside those loops, getting worse and worse, and he becomes stuck.

Even though this is sort of a parody of YA fantasy, Ness does a wonderful job of blending his “Indie Kid” parallel with Mikey’s. The build up to the climax is so subtle that you hardly know it is coming–I sort of skimmed the chapter headings, but I thought they detracted from the actual story line, so I mostly just followed it through the main book.

I loved that Ness gives Mikey such a strong support system–his chosen family–instead of using the “hero comes to save him from his anxiety” trope. There’s a lot of talk about how one of his fears is that he is the least needed person, or no one would miss him if he were gone–I feel that SO HARD. And even though Mikey acknowledges at one point that he KNOWS he is lucky to have so many people who love him, to someone with anxiety, it’s so hard to convince ourselves that this is reality most of the time.

I could go on and on about everything that was amazing about the anxiety/OCD rep in this story. I want to quote the entire psychiatrist appointment to you. But, then you wouldn’t have to read the book, and I really think you probably should go read it. It’s going on my MUST READS list for sure, guys. So, yeah. Do it.

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