Elan Mastai: All Our Wrong Todays

You know the future that people in the 1950s imagined we’d have? Well, it happened. In Tom Barren’s 2016, humanity thrives in a techno-utopian paradise of flying cars, moving sidewalks, and moon bases, where avocados never go bad and punk rock never existed . . . because it wasn’t necessary.

Except Tom just can’t seem to find his place in this dazzling, idealistic world, and that’s before his life gets turned upside down. Utterly blindsided by an accident of fate, Tom makes a rash decision that drastically changes not only his own life but the very fabric of the universe itself. In a time-travel mishap, Tom finds himself stranded in our 2016, what we think of as the real world. For Tom, our normal reality seems like a dystopian wasteland.

But when he discovers wonderfully unexpected versions of his family, his career, and—maybe, just maybe—his soul mate, Tom has a decision to make. Does he fix the flow of history, bringing his utopian universe back into existence, or does he try to forge a new life in our messy, unpredictable reality? Tom’s search for the answer takes him across countries, continents, and timelines in a quest to figure out, finally, who he really is and what his future—our future—is supposed to be.

Writing science fiction always seems like the hardest genre to me–there is always a problem to solve. When done right, the reader is transported directly into an alternate universe; when done wrong, all of the focus goes on the lack of research and the awkwardness or lack of world-building. The author has to be able to explain the problems and solutions well enough for a person like me to at least grasp the concept to make it believable–and also hold up to those smart enough to pick apart the numbers and equations in their heads.

All Our Wrong Todays is science fiction done WELL. I was immediately immersed into Tom’s whorling world of time travel between 2016 and 1965–and I had previously put down two books as DNF because I could not focus on anything. I was in serious danger of a book slump when I picked up Elan Mastai’s first novel. But instead, Tom’s fictional memoir saved both me and his world from total destruction.

This book does have some problems. Everybody in the book is straight, and while there are POC, they are mostly background characters.  Also, the relationships are a little sketchy, although the narrator does acknowledge that fact. He knows he’s an awkward guy going about everything the wrong way. Still–they are a bit problematic.

I am conflicted, because I hate “mental illness as a twist”–but I don’t think that is what is being done here. The book is a legit time travel story, but it does unpack some heavy mental illness and domestic abuse issues as a part of the plot. The narrator challenges and discusses them in the text. I can’t explain further without spoiling the book, but I think the author does a really good job of writing these issues in without using them as a plot device.

At first, I thought this was going to be a really great escape book for Inauguration Weekend. And it IS a good one to dive into, for sure. But this one will hit you deep. Can a book be fun, challenging, and heart wrenching all at the same time? Because All Our Wrong Todays certainly makes the effort.

NetGalley and Dutton provided an ARC for unbiased review. This post contains affiliate links.

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Heidi Heilig: The Girl From Everywhere

Nix has spent her entire life aboard her father’s ship, sailing across the centuries, across the world, across myth and imagination.

As long as her father has a map for it, he can sail to any time, any place, real or imagined: nineteenth-century China, the land from One Thousand and One Nights, a mythic version of Africa. Along the way they have found crewmates and friends, and even a disarming thief who could come to mean much more to Nix.

But the end to it all looms closer every day.

Her father is obsessed with obtaining the one map, 1868 Honolulu, that could take him back to his lost love, Nix’s mother. Even though getting it—and going there—could erase Nix’s very existence.

For the first time, Nix is entering unknown waters.

She could find herself, find her family, find her own fantastical ability, her own epic love.

Or she could disappear.

BOOK SLUMPS ARE HARD.

I went back and forth so many times on this one, and it took me three days to read it! But, I suppose that is why I put my blog on hiatus, so I wouldn’t have to rush, right? Forgive me for these off reviews, I’m clearly not myself right now. Still, for the sake of consistency, I want you know what I’ve read and what I thought while I read them. My brain won’t let me do otherwise. Just take these with a grain of salt, k? I’ll let you know once I catch up to myself when all this is said and done.

The @KeepItDiverse book club chose The Girl From Everywhere for their October read. Can I first of all just say that I love living in a small town because I’m able to get book club reads right away now? No more waiting two months for popular books. Woot!

Anyway, this was a bit of a slow starter, but it may have been because I was a bit hesitant. It reminded me straight off of Passenger by Alexandra Bracken, which I could not get into, and I was afraid this was going to be the same way. I gradually started falling into the story and it picked up speed. I like the idea of popping in and out of history, seeing different events happen.

There’s a love triangle here that is very confusing. It never really resolves itself. Which, on one hand, allows you to ship (pun intended) any way you like. But it is frustrating because there are so many unresolved feelings! Perhaps it’s building up to a sequel?

Another plot hole that really bothered me was the dragon. She got this dragon from her aunt at the beginning of the book–it eats pearls and has to live in salt water. Special mention was given to the bucket it lives in:  it can’t rust, had to have a handle so she could throw it over the side and be refreshed occasionally. And then the dragon disappears for most of the book. The bucket makes a short appearance later, but it just really doesn’t play much of a role, and seemed like a big detail that meant nothing. Maybe I missed something but it seemed odd to me.

Overall, the book was entertaining. There were lots of details about Hawaiian culture–where the author is from. The jokes about those damn Victorians made me laugh. It wasn’t my favorite book ever, but right now, I don’t think anything is my favorite thing ever, so if you like time travel, don’t count this one out.

 

UPDATE–Oh MAN this review is rough. I definitely need to go back and reread this book when I’m in a better mental state. Heidi is such a fantastic person, her activism is incredible. Please don’t count her book out just because of this slumpy review. If/When I read it again, I will be sure to update this. Leaving this up for authenticity, because I was going through a really hard time when I read it. But I did want to give this disclaimer because I admire the author quite a lot, for other reasons besides just her writing.

 

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Slaughterhouse-Five

Ever have a book where at the end you just say, “Oh thank GOD that’s over!” Yep. That was this book. Seriously, can someone explain to me what I just read, because I have absolutely no idea. This might be as bad as James Joyce…except I was reading it for Book Club, so I had to finish it. And somehow discuss it. God help me.

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This is not going to be an intelligent review folks. Because I’m seriously confused.

There are two ways of thinking that I have for Billy:

1. The book is a Sci-Fi novel and he really did get abducted and really can time-travel around. However, if that’s the case, I think it’s horribly done. There are absolutely no transitions to guide the reader from the alien parts and back to WWII and then “present-day.” It just jumps all over the place. Give me a tesseract or something with which to make sense of the time-space continuum.

2. Billy has severe PTSD and has suffered a complete schizophrenic breakdown, in which the aliens are his way of dealing with the war. That would explain the lack of transitions, because there probably wouldn’t be any transitions in his world either.

Ok, that’s as far as I’ve gotten. I’m curious to see what ya’ll have to say about this one. I know this is a hugely popular novel…it just was not for me. Vonnegut and I do not speak the same language.

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